Saturday, April 20, 2019

Where to Plant Perennials

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Here is a list of different Perennials to plant in different places and for a wide range of uses.

Plants for Long Bloom Season

  • Achillea ‘Moonshine’-Moonshine Yarrow
  • Asclepias tuberosa-Butterfly Weed
  • Coreopsis lanceolata-Coreopsis
  • Coreopsis verticillata ‘Moonbeam’
  • Dicentra eximia-Fringed Bleeding Heart
  • Echinacea purpurea-Purple Coneflower
  • Gaillardia x grandiflora-Blanket Flower
  • Rudbeckia fulgida ‘Goldsturm’-Black-eyed Susan
  • Salvia x superba-Perennial Salvia
  • Scabiosa spp.-Pincushion Flower
  • Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’-Showy Stonecrop or Live-Forever
  • Veronica spicata ‘Sunny Border Blue’-Spike Speedwell

Fragrant Flowers

  • Arabis caucasica-Rock Cress
  • Convallaria majalis-Lily-of-the-Valley
  • Dianthus plumarius-Cottage Pinks
  • Dictamnus albus-Gas Plant
  • Hosta plantaginea-Fragrant Plantain Lily
  • Iris hybrids-Iris
  • Lavandula angustifolia-English Lavender
  • Paeonia lactiflora-Peony
  • Viola odorata-Sweet Violet

Flowers for Cutting

  • Achillea spp.-Achillea or Yarrow
  • Aconitum napellus-Garden Monkshood
  • Alchemilla mollis-Lady’s Mantle
  • Anemone x hybrida-Japanese Anemone
  • Aquilegia spp.-Columbine
  • Armeria maritima-Common or Sea Thrift
  • Astrantia major-Great Masterwort
  • Campanula persicifolia-Peach-leaved Bellflower
  • Chrysanthemum x superbum-Shasta Daisy
  • Convallaria majalus-Lily-of-the-Valley
  • Coreopsis spp.-Coreopsis
  • Delphinium elatum-Delphinium or Larkspur
  • Dicentra spp.-Bleeding Heart
  • Echinacea purpurea-Purple Coneflower
  • Echinops ritro-Small Globe Thistle
  • Gaillardia spp.-Blanket Flower
  • Gypsophilia paniculata-Baby’s Breath
  • Heliopsis helianthoides-Sunflower Heliopsis
  • Heuchera sanguinea-Coralbells
  • Lavandula angustifolia-English Lavender
  • Liatris spp.-Gayfeather
  • Lilium spp.-Hardy Lilies
  • Lupinus ‘Russell Hybrid’-Russel Hybrid Lupine
  • Paeonia hybrids-Peony
  • Penstemon spp.-Beardtongue
  • Platycodon grandiflorus-Balloon Flower
  • Rudbeckia spp.-Black-eyed Susan
  • Scabiosa spp.-Pincushion Flower
  • Stokesia laevis-Stokes Aster
  • Veronica spicata-Spike Speedwell

Plants for Dried Flower or Fruit Use

  • Achillea spp.-Achillea or Yarrow
  • Alchemilla mollis-Lady’s Mantle
  • Asclepias tuberosa-Butterfly Weed
  • Baptisia australis-False Indigo
  • Catananche caerulea-Cupid’s Dart
  • Echinops ritro-Small Globe Thistle
  • Gypsophilia paniculata-Baby’s Breath
  • Iris siberica-Siberian Iris (seed pod)
  • Lavandula angustifolia-English Lavender
  • Liatris spp.-Gayfeather
  • Limonium latifolium-Statice
  • Papaver orientale-Oriental Poppy (seed pod)
  • Physalis alkekengi-Chinese Lanterns (seed pod)
  • Scabiosa spp.-Pincushion Flower

Attractive to Butterflies

  • Achillea spp.-Achillea or Yarrow
  • Armeria maritima-Common or Sea Thrift
  • Aruncus dioicus-Goat’s Beard
  • Asclepias tuberosa-Butterfly Weed
  • Aubrieta deltoidea-False Rock Cress
  • Chrysanthemum spp.-Mums
  • Coreopsis spp.-Coreopsis
  • Dictamnus albus-Gas Plant
  • Echinacea purpurea-Purple Coneflower
  • Gaillardia spp.-Blanket Flower
  • Lavandula angustifolia-English Lavender
  • Liatris spp.-Gayfeather
  • Monarda didyma-Bee Balm
  • Phlox paniculata-Summer Phlox
  • Rudbeckia spp.-Black-Eyed Susan
  • Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’-Showy Stonecrop or Live-Forever

Attractive to Hummingbirds

  • Alcea rosea-Hollyhock
  • Aquilega spp.-Columbine
  • Asclepias tuberosa-Butterfly Weed
  • Dianthus spp.-Cottage Pinks
  • Dicentra spp.-Bleeding Heart
  • Digitalis spp.-Foxglove
  • Hemerocallis spp.-Daylily
  • Heuchera sanguinea-Coralbells
  • Lobelia cardinalis-Cardinal Flower
  • Monarda didyma-Bee Balm
  • Penstemon spp.-Beardtongue

Plants for Sunny, Dry Areas

  • Achillea spp.-Achillea or Yarrow
  • Anthemis tinctoria-Golden Marguerite
  • Arabis caucasica-Rock Cress
  • Armeria maritima-Common or Sea Thrift
  • Artemisia spp.-Artemesia
  • Asclepias tuberosa-Butterfly Weed
  • Catananche caerulea-Cupid’s Dart
  • Coreopsis spp.-Coreopsis
  • Echinops ritro-Small Globe Thistle
  • Euphorbia spp.-Spurge
  • Gaillardia spp.-Blanket Flower
  • Helianthus x multiflorus-Perennial Sunflower
  • Hemerocallis hybrids-Daylily
  • Lavandula angustifolia-English Lavender
  • Liatris spp.-Gayfeather
  • Malva alcea-Hollyhock Mallow
  • Oenothera spp.-Sundrops
  • Opuntia humifusa-Prickly Pear Cactus
  • Perovskia atriplicifolia-Russian Sage
  • Polygonum cuspidatum var. compactum-Fleeceflower
  • Rudbeckia spp.-Black-eyed Susan
  • Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’-Showy Stonecrop or Live-Forever
  • Sempervivum tectorum-Hens & Chickens
  • Stachys byzantina-Lamb’s Ear
  • Yucca filimentosa-Yucca

Plants for Moist to Wet Areas

  • Aruncus dioicus-Goat’s Beard
  • Astilbe x arendsii-Astilbe
  • Campanula glomerata-Clustered Bellflower
  • Cimicifuga racemosa-Black Snakeroot
  • Dicentra spp.-Bleeding Heart
  • Houttuynia cordata ‘Variegata’-Houttuynia
  • Iris ensata-Japanese Iris
  • Ligularia spp.-Ligularia
  • Lobelia cardinalis-Cardinal Flower
  • Lysimachia clethroides-Gooseneck Loosestrife
  • Lysimachia punctata-Yellow Loosestrife
  • Matteuccia pensylvanica-Ostrich fern
  • Physostegia virginiana-Obedient Plant
  • Rodgersia pinnata-Featherleaf Rodgersflower
  • Tradescantia x andersoniana-Virginia Spiderwort
  • Trollis europaeus-Globeflower

Plants for Full Shade

  • Ajuga reptans-Bugleweed
  • Arum italicum ‘Pictum’-Painted Arum
  • Asarum spp.-Wild Gingers
  • Convallaria majalis-Lily-of-the-Valley
  • Dodecatheon media-Common Shooting Star
  • Galium odoratum-Sweet Woodruff
  • Helleborus orientalis-Lenten Rose
  • Hosta spp.-Hosta
  • Lamium maculatum-Spotted Deadnettle
  • Liriope spicata-Creeping Lilyturf
  • Mertensia virginica-Virginia Bluebells
  • Osmunda regalis-Royal Fern
  • Polygonatum biflorum-Small Solomon’s Seal
  • Polygonatum commutatum-Great Solomon’s Seal
  • Pulmonaria angustifolia-Blue Lungwort
  • Pulmonaria saccharata-Bethlehem Sage
  • Tiarella cordifolia-Foam Flower
  • Tradescantia x andersoniana-Virginia Spiderwort
  • Viola odorata-Sweet Violet

Plants for Partial Shade

  • Alchemilla mollis-Lady’s Mantle
  • Anemone x hybrida-Japanese Anemone
  • Aquilegia spp.-Columbine
  • Astilbe spp.-Astilbe
  • Bergenia cordifolia-Heartleaf Bergenia
  • Brunnera macrophylla-Siberian Bugloss
  • Ceratostigma plumbaginoides-Plumbago
  • Dicentra spp.-Bleeding Heart
  • Doronicum cordatum-Leopardsbane
  • Geranium spp.-Cranesbill or Hardy Geranium
  • Heuchera sanguinea-Coralbells
  • Myosotis sylvatica-Garden Forget-me-not
  • Tricyrtis hirta-Toadlily

1 COMMENT

  1. KJ (USA)

    Use of Bedding Plants

    In the past decade, no other segment of the floriculture production industry has enjoyed more public interest and use of its product than bedding plants (annual flowering plants). Bedding plants have become an indispensable item for landscape use, presenting an array of flowers and foliage that add color and texture to the landscapes of homes, apartment complexes, shopping malls, public buildings, city streets and parks.

    In addition to bedding plants, perennials have experienced a meteoric rise in popularity. It is expected the demand for these plants will increase sharply in the years ahead, as more consumers experience the benefits perennials provide.

    A National Gardening Association survey done by the Gallup Organization shows that overall, 80 percent of the 93.3 million households in America (85 million), participated in one or more types of indoor and outdoor lawn and garden activities in 1990, with each household spending an average of $284.

    Consumer spending on”flower gardening” was $1.68 billion in 1988 and $2.27 billion in 1990; a 23 percent increase. This was 10 percent of all consumer dollars spent in gardening.
    The Bedding Plant Industry

    In a move affirming horticulture’s growing economic significance, the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture has created the National Chair for Florist and Nursery Crops Review. Dr. Henry Marc Cathey, former director of the U.S. National Arboretum, assumed the post in early September of 1991.

    Dean Plowman, ARS administrator, indicates that floral and nursery businesses are the country’s two fastest growing segments of agriculture, with a combined annual farm value of $8 billion. “They’re finally recognizing the importance and contribution of the floriculture and nursery industries – the economic impact in terms of product value and labor dollars,” he says.”More and more, individual state surveys are showing that these crops are No. 1 – or at least among the top-value crops.”

    There have been significant changes in the floriculture industry the last 20 years. Perhaps the most significant has been the strong, steady advance of bedding plants, virtually synonymous with the nation’s number one outdoor leisure activity, gardening. In the total domestic U.S. commercial flower industry, bedding plants had a 13.5 percent share of the market in 1970 (shared with fresh cut flowers, potted flowers, and foliage). In 1979, the bedding plant share had increased to 18.7 percent, and by 1988, was the dominant player in the industry, owning a 33.7 percent market share.

    Bedding plant production in the United States is decentralized and dispersed rather than being concentrated in a small number of states. The top 10 states encompassed 71 percent of the total wholesale value reported by 28 states in 1988. California is the top producer, with 19.7 percent of the total. The other top nine producing states include (in order) Michigan, Ohio, Florida, New York, Pennsylvania, Texas, North Carolina, Wisconsin and Illinois.

    Ohio ranks third in bedding plant production. In 1988, there were 458 growers in the state. Total production area was 10,567,000 square feet. A total of 5,225,000 flats were produced at a wholesale value of $28.8 million dollars.

    Geraniums are the #1 bedding plant, with 19.6 percent of the market, followed by impatiens (12.2 percent), petunias (9.7 percent), marigolds (7.4 percent) begonias (5.2 percent), pansies (3.4 percent), salvia and vinca (each 2.4 percent). Geraniums have dominated the market since 1979 while impatiens have gained a greater share of the total through the years.

    Expectations are high for continued bedding plant market growth. Future demand will likely increase along with higher disposable incomes, higher relative market prices for competing items that make bedding plants a better buy, a continued emphasis on gardening and landscaping, greater knowledge and sophistication of the public about gardening, and increased recognition of the therapeutic value of gardening.

    It appears that the nineties will show continued inherent market strength for the bedding plant industry with weather, as usual, playing a large part in any particular season’s success. Entrepreneurs who understand their customers and can cater to their demands will likely be very successful in this decade.

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